Emily Gray

7 Celeb Looks from the ’90s That Work Just as Well Today

Classic looks are just that: classic. It doesn’t matter whether something was worn two decades ago or yesterday, if it’s real fashion, it’s timeless. We sorted through photos of our favorite style stars of the ’90s (and it just so happens that they’re all still style stars in 2017!) for notable looks that can also be spotted today.

A chic trench? A great pair of jeans? A slip dress? All ’90s faves that are still worn on the streets today. Scroll down to take a stroll down memory lane—and perhaps to pick out your next outfit.

VIDEO: You Can Order These 13 Treats From the ’90s

Dame Judi: I love Tracey Ullman’s ‘evil Judi’ sketches

Dame Judi: I love Tracey Ullman’s ‘evil Judi’ sketches

Tracey Ullman as Dame Judi Dench

Image caption

Tracey Ullman as Dame Judi Dench: A menace to society

Dame Judi Dench has declared herself a big fan of comedy sketches that show her using her fame to get away with shoplifting and other petty crime.

Tracey Ullman played Dame Judi last year as a nefarious national treasure – stealing, smashing china in a boutique and hurling bags of dog poo into trees.

Speaking to BBC Radio 4’s Front Row about Ullman’s portrayal, she said: “I love it. I dote on it.

“But I get into trouble now if I go into a shop with a bag over my arm.”

Ullman is “brilliant”, the actress said – but joked that the sketches in the BBC One comedy show have caused problems.

“It’s tricky, people look at me in a funny way,” she said, adding: “A man came up to me in M&S the other day and said to me, ‘I’ve got my eye on you’.”

Image copyright
PA

Image caption

The real Dame Judi: The paragon of respectability

Dame Judi was speaking as she unveiled a blue plaque for her friend, the late actor Sir John Gielgud, at his former London home.

She told Front Row that Sir John was one of the greatest Shakespearean actors and that young actors would do well to learn from his performances.

She said: “He used to present the whole of a sentence, the whole arc of a sentence, or the meaning of a passage of Shakespeare.

“We’re in an unfortunate century where people think, ‘oh Shakespeare, it needs to be changed because we don’t understand what things mean’. That’s not so. One can understand it and John was sublime at being able to tell you exactly what it meant.”


Follow us on Facebook, on Twitter @BBCNewsEnts, or on Instagram at bbcnewsents. If you have a story suggestion email [email protected].

Jonathan Demme, director of The Silence of the Lambs, dies at 73

Jonathan Demme, director of The Silence of the Lambs, dies at 73

Jonathan DemmeImage copyright
AFP

Image caption

Demme won the best director Oscar in 1992 for The Silence of the Lambs

Jonathan Demme, the Oscar-winning director of The Silence of the Lambs, has died in New York at the age of 73.

His publicist confirmed he died from complications from oesophageal cancer.

Born in 1944, Demme’s other features included Philadelphia, Something Wild and the Talking Heads documentary Stop Making Sense.

Tom Hanks, who won an Oscar for his performance in Philadelphia, told the Press Association Demme was “the grandest of men”.

He said: “Jonathan taught us how big a heart a person can have, and how it will guide how we live and what we do for a living.”

Image copyright
Getty Images

Image caption

Both Demme and actress Jodie Foster won Oscars for The Silence of the Lambs

Demme’s own Oscar was for best director for The Silence of the Lambs in 1992.

The second film to feature serial killer Hannibal Lecter, it is one of only three films to win the so-called “big five” Oscars.

As well as best director, the 1991 film was named best picture, won a screenplay prize and saw both of its lead actors honoured.

Demme also steered Mary Steenburgen to a best supporting actress Oscar for his 1980 film Melvin and Howard.

In recent years he worked with Anne Hathaway on Rachel Getting Married and directed Meryl Streep in both Ricki and the Flash and his 2004 remake of The Manchurian Candidate.

His most recent film, Justin Timberlake + the Tennessee Kids, showed Timberlake in concert in 2015.

Tributes flowed in from the film world:

British actress Thandie Newton, who worked with him on Beloved and The Truth About Charlie, said she was “deeply saddened” by his passing.

Image copyright
@thandienewton

Actor-turned-director Ron Howard remembered Demme as “a great artist, humanitarian, activist & a warm encouraging colleague”.

Image copyright
@RealRonHoward

Clerks director Kevin Smith, also writing on Twitter, praised Demme for his “honest cinematic storytelling”.

Image copyright
@ThatKevinSmith

Fellow film-maker Barry Jenkins, who directed the Oscar-winning Moonlight, wrote: “Met tons through the Moonlight run but my man Demme was the kindest, most generous. A MASSIVE soul. He lived in love. And rests in peace.”

Director Jim Jarmusch wrote: “Inspiring filmmaker, musical explorer, ornithologist (!), and truly wonderful and generous person.”

Author Stephen King tweeted: “Deeply sad to hear my friend, neighbor, and colleague Jonathan Demme has passed on. He was one of the real good guys. I miss you, buddy.”

Elijah Wood, star of the Lord of the Rings films, tweeted that he was “sad to hear” of the director’s death.

Edgar Wright, the British director of Hot Fuzz and Shaun of the Dead, said: “Admired his movies, his documentaries, his concert films. He could do anything.”

In a statement, the director’s publicist said: “Sadly, I can confirm that Jonathan passed away early this morning in his Manhattan apartment, surrounded by his wife, Joanne Howard, and three children.

“He died from complications from oesophageal cancer and is survived by his children Ramona, age 29, and her husband James Molloy, Brooklyn, age 26, and Jos, age 21.

“There will be a private family funeral. Any possible further plans will be announce later.

“In lieu of flowers, the family has asked that donations be made to Americans For Immigrant Justice in Miami, FL [Florida].”

Image copyright
Orion Pictures/REX/Shutterstock

Image caption

Sir Anthony Hopkins (right) was also honoured for the 1991 film

Born Robert Jonathan Demme on New York’s Long Island, Demme began his directing career working for famed producer Roger Corman.

His earliest credits included Caged Heat, a thriller set in a women’s prison, and Crazy Mama, a road movie starring Cloris Leachman.


Follow us on Facebook, on Twitter @BBCNewsEnts, or on Instagram at bbcnewsents. If you have a story suggestion email [email protected].

Editor Favorite Jewelry Line Kathleen Whitaker Launches Second Stone Collection 

Kathleen Whitaker’s first stone jewelry line became an instant favorite among InStyle fashion editors when it débuted last spring. All of us were absolutely smitten with the raw cuts and vivid colors, so it was no surprise that a pair of aquamarine earrings and a quartz ring would wind up on our now famous October 2016 FLOTUS cover. I was more than thrilled to hear that Whitaker was launching a second stone collection, and after seeing the pieces, I can say that this assemblage surpassed my expectations. Known for not restricting rare, beautiful stones within gold forms, she selected amber, pietersite, and even vintage Venetian drawn glass beads as some of the features in these very special pieces.

Today, this collection is available for purchase on her own website, but it will also be available for the very first time at the Barneys New York flagship location in N.Y.C. from April 28 to May 21.

VIDEO: 12 Perfect Outfit Ideas for Spring

Get a sneak peek below at some of the stunning pieces on offer.

You Must See the “Magnificent Jewels” from Sotheby’s Auction Before They’re Sold

Whether you are a collector, window shopper, or simply love gems, we suggest you run (NOT WALK!) to Sotheby’s in New York to preview their one-of-a-kind collection of jewels being auctioned off this morning. Not in the Big Apple? No excuses. You can browse the 254 lots online as well.

Some of the show-stopping highlights: The legendary Stotesbury Emerald, a piece that has been M.I.A. since 1971; imported colored diamonds; and a citrine suite by Sterlé, which previously belonged to Queen Narriman of Egypt. Here are some of our favorites from the auction.

VIDEO: InStyle December Issue Jewelry

If You Have $5, These Are the Beauty Products You Need in Your Life

Who says that you have to spend a million bucks to have great skin, makeup, and hair? At InStyle, we’ve tried just about everything. But sometimes, there’s nothing like a good ole drugstore find, especially ones that are less than $5. You can literally find a great mask to treat your skin-care problems and find an amazing concealer to cover blemishes for less than the price of your daily frappuccino. And there’s even something to keep your hair smelling great and to make manicures dry faster. You might even decided to retire your luxury beauty products after giving these drugstore deals a try.

Video: The Crazy Cost of a Lifetime of a Beauty

Not convinced? Just keep on scrolling for a round up of our favorite beauty finds all under $5.

Paula Hawkins’ new novel Into The Water confuses critics

Paula Hawkins’ new novel Into The Water confuses critics

Paula HawkinsImage copyright
Getty Images

Image caption

The Girl on the Train was Paula Hawkins’s first novel under her own name

The only problem with writing a debut novel that sells 20 million copies and spawns a Hollywood film is – your follow-up has a lot to live up to.

Paula Hawkins’ 2015 debut The Girl on the Train was a publishing phenomenon, and the first reviews for her new book Into The Water are in.

And most critics are not impressed.

Reviewing it for The Guardian, crime author Val McDermid predicted Hawkins’ sales would be “massive” but “her readers’ enjoyment may be less so”.

McDermid was puzzled by the 11 narrative voices used in Into The Water, which is released in the UK next week.

She wrote: “These characters are so similar in tone and register – even when some are in first person and others in third – that they are almost impossible to tell apart, which ends up being both monotonous and confusing.”

She added: “Hawkins had a mountain to climb after the success of The Girl on the Train and no doubt the sales of her second thriller will be massive. I suspect her readers’ enjoyment may be less so.”

Image copyright
Dreamworks

Slate‘s Laura Miller declared that Into the Water “isn’t an impressive book”.

She wrote: “Its tone is uniformly lugubrious and maudlin, and Hawkins’ characters seldom rise to the level of two dimensions, let alone three.”

But Miller pointed out: “None of this will necessarily prevent Into the Water from triumphing at the cash register. The book surely will become a best-seller, if only on the strength of residual name recognition for The Girl on the Train.”

Janet Maslin wasn’t much more enthusiastic in The New York Times.

“If The Girl on the Train seemed overplotted and confusing to some readers, it is a model of clarity next to this latest effort.

“Her goal may be to build suspense, but all she achieves is confusion. Into the Water is jam-packed with minor characters and stories that go nowhere.”

‘Plausible and grimly gripping’

She asks: “What happened to the Paula Hawkins who structured The Girl on the Train so ingeniously?”

However, The New Statesman‘s Leo Robson defended the book, writing: “Most of the time, the novel is plausible and grimly gripping.

“Into the Water follows its predecessor in applying laser scrutiny to a small patch, but there are signs of growth and greater ambition.”

He described Hawkins’s writing as “addictive”, adding that the novel “is on a par with The Girl on a Train”.

Image copyright
Getty Images

Image caption

The film adaptation of The Girl on the Train was released last September

The Evening Standard‘s David Sexton wrote: “Unfortunately, Into the Water turns out to be hard work.”

“There’s a ridiculous multiplication of narrators from the start, some first-person, others third, so that on first reading it is almost impossible to keep track of who’s who and what relation they have to one another… several of the stories never really cohere.”

‘Overambitious’

Marcel Berlins in The Times said: “This novel has its intriguing attributes.

“It does not follow the usual samey fashionable pattern of ‘domestic noir’ and psychological thrillers. For that Hawkins ought to be commended, even if the result is not a full success.

“She is let down by her overambitious structure and a lack of sufficient tension. Hawkins does not quite pass the second-book test.”

Of course, reviews of any kind are unlikely to deter the millions who enjoyed The Girl on the Train.

After all, critics didn’t much like the film adaptation of her previous book, starring Emily Blunt, but that didn’t stop it being a box office success.


Follow us on Facebook, on Twitter @BBCNewsEnts, or on Instagram at bbcnewsents. If you have a story suggestion email [email protected].

Bristol’s Colston Hall to drop ‘toxic’ slave trader name

Bristol’s Colston Hall to drop ‘toxic’ slave trader name

  • 26 April 2017
  • From the section Bristol

Colston Hall, Bristol

Image caption

Colston Hall is due to close for a £49m revamp at the end of the year and reopen in 2020

A music venue is to ditch the “toxic” name it shares with a 17th Century slave trader.

Colston Hall bosses had previously maintained that the Bristol attraction was named after the street it is on, rather than Edward Colston.

Much of the Bristol-born MP and merchant’s wealth came from the slave trade.

The change, which will not come into effect until 2020, follows a campaign to urge Colston Hall to alter its name.

Ready for ‘backlash’

Louise Mitchell, chief executive of the Bristol Music Trust charity that runs Colston Hall, said it was the “right thing to do” for artists, the public and the “diverse workforce” at the venue, which recently announced plans for a refurbishment costing nearly £50m.

She said: “The name Colston does not reflect the trust’s values as a progressive, forward-thinking and open arts organisation.

“We want to look to the future and ensure the whole city is proud of its transformed concert hall and so when we open the new hall, it will be with a new name.”

Media playback is unsupported on your device
Media captionLouise Mitchell, chief executive of the Bristol Music Trust charity that runs the venue said it was the “right thing to do”

She acknowledged there would be a “backlash” over the change, but admitted the trust had “needed to resolve” the issue ahead of talks with potential sponsors.

“Effectively, I’ve been selling a toxic brand up to now,” she said.

“We need to move forward on this. It’s not actually about commerce, it’s about doing the right thing.”

More on this story, and other news from the West

Over the years, some of the world’s biggest music stars have performed at Colston Hall, including The Beatles, David Bowie, Ella Fitzgerald, Louis Armstrong and Bob Dylan.

The legendary Bristol band Massive Attack have always refused to play at Colston Hall, and the city’s mayor Marvin Rees has said he is “not a fan” of the name. A petition launched in February calling for a change gathered more than 2,000 signatories.


Edward Colston (1636-1721)

Image copyright
Phillip Halling

Image caption

A grand bronze statue of Edward Colston has stood in Bristol city centre since 1895

  • Colston was born into a prosperous Bristol merchant’s family and, although he lived in London for many years, was always closely associated with the city
  • By 1672, he had his own business in the capital trading in slaves, cloth, wine and sugar. A significant proportion of Colston’s wealth came directly or indirectly from the slave trade
  • In 1680, he became an official of the Royal African Company, which at the time held the monopoly in Britain on slave trading
  • He donated to churches and hospitals in Bristol, also founding two almshouses and a school
  • Colston also lent money to the Bristol corporation and was a city MP for a short time
  • The bronze statue commemorating Colston in the city of his birth has an inscription on it which reads: “Erected by citizens of Bristol as a memorial of one of the most virtuous and wise sons of their city”. There is no mention of his role in the slave trade

Source: BBC History/Nigel Pocock


However, the majority of those who have taken to BBC Radio Bristol’s Facebook page to express their opinions have not welcomed the move.

Chris Goldsworthy said it was “political correctness gone mad”, while Nick Davies said it was a mistake as the “past should not be airbrushed out”.

Kate Gillam said “changing the name won’t change what happened. It’s part of our heritage”.

The music venue is not the only place in Bristol with links to Colston that has come under fire. Bristol Cathedral is reportedly considering removing a large stained-glass window dedicated to the merchant, following criticism from anti-racism campaigners.

Johnny Depp blames managers for money woes

Johnny Depp blames managers for money woes

Johnny DeppImage copyright
Getty Images

Image caption

Depp said it was his right to spend money on cotton balls if he so desired

Johnny Depp has claimed his ex-business managers are to blame for his financial woes – not his lavish lifestyle.

“I’ve worked very, very hard for a lot of years and trusted a lot of people, some who’ve clearly let me down,” the actor told the Wall Street Journal.

The Alice in Wonderland star sued The Management Group in January for $25m (£19.5m) alleging fraud and negligence.

The Management Group responded with a countersuit, attributing his financial troubles to a $2m-a-month lifestyle.

Image copyright
Disney

Image caption

The actor will shortly be seen reprising his Captain Jack Sparrow role

In his first public comments on the matter, Depp denied that his debts were down to profligate spending. “Why didn’t they drop me as a client if I was so out of control?” he said.

But he did give some insight into his shopping habits. “It’s my money,” the actor was quoted as saying. “If I want to buy 15,000 cotton balls a day, it’s my thing.”

Depp, 53, alleges that The Management Group’s handling of his affairs led to him being more than $40m (£31m) in debt.

He also accuses the LA firm, run by brothers Joel and Rob Mandel, of failing to file his taxes on time and taking out high-interest loans on his behalf.

Costly send-off

In their own legal action, The Management Group said their former client had “refused to live within his means, despite… repeated warnings about his financial condition”.

They claimed the actor’s outgoings included $3m (£2.3m) to blast the ashes of author Hunter S Thompson out of a cannon – a send-off Depp said had actually cost him $5m (£3.9m).

The Oscar-nominated actor is best-known for his role as Captain Jack Sparrow in the Pirates of the Caribbean series, the fifth instalment of which arrives this summer.

Disney have announced that Dead Men Tell No Tales will have its world premiere at the Shanghai Disney resort on 11 May – the first Hollywood premiere to be held in mainland China.


Follow us on Facebook, on Twitter @BBCNewsEnts, or on Instagram at bbcnewsents. If you have a story suggestion email [email protected].