Emily Gray

You Must See the “Magnificent Jewels” from Sotheby’s Auction Before They’re Sold

Whether you are a collector, window shopper, or simply love gems, we suggest you run (NOT WALK!) to Sotheby’s in New York to preview their one-of-a-kind collection of jewels being auctioned off this morning. Not in the Big Apple? No excuses. You can browse the 254 lots online as well.

Some of the show-stopping highlights: The legendary Stotesbury Emerald, a piece that has been M.I.A. since 1971; imported colored diamonds; and a citrine suite by Sterlé, which previously belonged to Queen Narriman of Egypt. Here are some of our favorites from the auction.

VIDEO: InStyle December Issue Jewelry

If You Have $5, These Are the Beauty Products You Need in Your Life

Who says that you have to spend a million bucks to have great skin, makeup, and hair? At InStyle, we’ve tried just about everything. But sometimes, there’s nothing like a good ole drugstore find, especially ones that are less than $5. You can literally find a great mask to treat your skin-care problems and find an amazing concealer to cover blemishes for less than the price of your daily frappuccino. And there’s even something to keep your hair smelling great and to make manicures dry faster. You might even decided to retire your luxury beauty products after giving these drugstore deals a try.

Video: The Crazy Cost of a Lifetime of a Beauty

Not convinced? Just keep on scrolling for a round up of our favorite beauty finds all under $5.

Paula Hawkins’ new novel Into The Water confuses critics

Paula Hawkins’ new novel Into The Water confuses critics

Paula HawkinsImage copyright
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The Girl on the Train was Paula Hawkins’s first novel under her own name

The only problem with writing a debut novel that sells 20 million copies and spawns a Hollywood film is – your follow-up has a lot to live up to.

Paula Hawkins’ 2015 debut The Girl on the Train was a publishing phenomenon, and the first reviews for her new book Into The Water are in.

And most critics are not impressed.

Reviewing it for The Guardian, crime author Val McDermid predicted Hawkins’ sales would be “massive” but “her readers’ enjoyment may be less so”.

McDermid was puzzled by the 11 narrative voices used in Into The Water, which is released in the UK next week.

She wrote: “These characters are so similar in tone and register – even when some are in first person and others in third – that they are almost impossible to tell apart, which ends up being both monotonous and confusing.”

She added: “Hawkins had a mountain to climb after the success of The Girl on the Train and no doubt the sales of her second thriller will be massive. I suspect her readers’ enjoyment may be less so.”

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Dreamworks

Slate‘s Laura Miller declared that Into the Water “isn’t an impressive book”.

She wrote: “Its tone is uniformly lugubrious and maudlin, and Hawkins’ characters seldom rise to the level of two dimensions, let alone three.”

But Miller pointed out: “None of this will necessarily prevent Into the Water from triumphing at the cash register. The book surely will become a best-seller, if only on the strength of residual name recognition for The Girl on the Train.”

Janet Maslin wasn’t much more enthusiastic in The New York Times.

“If The Girl on the Train seemed overplotted and confusing to some readers, it is a model of clarity next to this latest effort.

“Her goal may be to build suspense, but all she achieves is confusion. Into the Water is jam-packed with minor characters and stories that go nowhere.”

‘Plausible and grimly gripping’

She asks: “What happened to the Paula Hawkins who structured The Girl on the Train so ingeniously?”

However, The New Statesman‘s Leo Robson defended the book, writing: “Most of the time, the novel is plausible and grimly gripping.

“Into the Water follows its predecessor in applying laser scrutiny to a small patch, but there are signs of growth and greater ambition.”

He described Hawkins’s writing as “addictive”, adding that the novel “is on a par with The Girl on a Train”.

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Getty Images

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The film adaptation of The Girl on the Train was released last September

The Evening Standard‘s David Sexton wrote: “Unfortunately, Into the Water turns out to be hard work.”

“There’s a ridiculous multiplication of narrators from the start, some first-person, others third, so that on first reading it is almost impossible to keep track of who’s who and what relation they have to one another… several of the stories never really cohere.”

‘Overambitious’

Marcel Berlins in The Times said: “This novel has its intriguing attributes.

“It does not follow the usual samey fashionable pattern of ‘domestic noir’ and psychological thrillers. For that Hawkins ought to be commended, even if the result is not a full success.

“She is let down by her overambitious structure and a lack of sufficient tension. Hawkins does not quite pass the second-book test.”

Of course, reviews of any kind are unlikely to deter the millions who enjoyed The Girl on the Train.

After all, critics didn’t much like the film adaptation of her previous book, starring Emily Blunt, but that didn’t stop it being a box office success.


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Bristol’s Colston Hall to drop ‘toxic’ slave trader name

Bristol’s Colston Hall to drop ‘toxic’ slave trader name

  • 26 April 2017
  • From the section Bristol

Colston Hall, Bristol

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Colston Hall is due to close for a £49m revamp at the end of the year and reopen in 2020

A music venue is to ditch the “toxic” name it shares with a 17th Century slave trader.

Colston Hall bosses had previously maintained that the Bristol attraction was named after the street it is on, rather than Edward Colston.

Much of the Bristol-born MP and merchant’s wealth came from the slave trade.

The change, which will not come into effect until 2020, follows a campaign to urge Colston Hall to alter its name.

Ready for ‘backlash’

Louise Mitchell, chief executive of the Bristol Music Trust charity that runs Colston Hall, said it was the “right thing to do” for artists, the public and the “diverse workforce” at the venue, which recently announced plans for a refurbishment costing nearly £50m.

She said: “The name Colston does not reflect the trust’s values as a progressive, forward-thinking and open arts organisation.

“We want to look to the future and ensure the whole city is proud of its transformed concert hall and so when we open the new hall, it will be with a new name.”

Media playback is unsupported on your device
Media captionLouise Mitchell, chief executive of the Bristol Music Trust charity that runs the venue said it was the “right thing to do”

She acknowledged there would be a “backlash” over the change, but admitted the trust had “needed to resolve” the issue ahead of talks with potential sponsors.

“Effectively, I’ve been selling a toxic brand up to now,” she said.

“We need to move forward on this. It’s not actually about commerce, it’s about doing the right thing.”

More on this story, and other news from the West

Over the years, some of the world’s biggest music stars have performed at Colston Hall, including The Beatles, David Bowie, Ella Fitzgerald, Louis Armstrong and Bob Dylan.

The legendary Bristol band Massive Attack have always refused to play at Colston Hall, and the city’s mayor Marvin Rees has said he is “not a fan” of the name. A petition launched in February calling for a change gathered more than 2,000 signatories.


Edward Colston (1636-1721)

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Phillip Halling

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A grand bronze statue of Edward Colston has stood in Bristol city centre since 1895

  • Colston was born into a prosperous Bristol merchant’s family and, although he lived in London for many years, was always closely associated with the city
  • By 1672, he had his own business in the capital trading in slaves, cloth, wine and sugar. A significant proportion of Colston’s wealth came directly or indirectly from the slave trade
  • In 1680, he became an official of the Royal African Company, which at the time held the monopoly in Britain on slave trading
  • He donated to churches and hospitals in Bristol, also founding two almshouses and a school
  • Colston also lent money to the Bristol corporation and was a city MP for a short time
  • The bronze statue commemorating Colston in the city of his birth has an inscription on it which reads: “Erected by citizens of Bristol as a memorial of one of the most virtuous and wise sons of their city”. There is no mention of his role in the slave trade

Source: BBC History/Nigel Pocock


However, the majority of those who have taken to BBC Radio Bristol’s Facebook page to express their opinions have not welcomed the move.

Chris Goldsworthy said it was “political correctness gone mad”, while Nick Davies said it was a mistake as the “past should not be airbrushed out”.

Kate Gillam said “changing the name won’t change what happened. It’s part of our heritage”.

The music venue is not the only place in Bristol with links to Colston that has come under fire. Bristol Cathedral is reportedly considering removing a large stained-glass window dedicated to the merchant, following criticism from anti-racism campaigners.

Johnny Depp blames managers for money woes

Johnny Depp blames managers for money woes

Johnny DeppImage copyright
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Depp said it was his right to spend money on cotton balls if he so desired

Johnny Depp has claimed his ex-business managers are to blame for his financial woes – not his lavish lifestyle.

“I’ve worked very, very hard for a lot of years and trusted a lot of people, some who’ve clearly let me down,” the actor told the Wall Street Journal.

The Alice in Wonderland star sued The Management Group in January for $25m (£19.5m) alleging fraud and negligence.

The Management Group responded with a countersuit, attributing his financial troubles to a $2m-a-month lifestyle.

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Disney

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The actor will shortly be seen reprising his Captain Jack Sparrow role

In his first public comments on the matter, Depp denied that his debts were down to profligate spending. “Why didn’t they drop me as a client if I was so out of control?” he said.

But he did give some insight into his shopping habits. “It’s my money,” the actor was quoted as saying. “If I want to buy 15,000 cotton balls a day, it’s my thing.”

Depp, 53, alleges that The Management Group’s handling of his affairs led to him being more than $40m (£31m) in debt.

He also accuses the LA firm, run by brothers Joel and Rob Mandel, of failing to file his taxes on time and taking out high-interest loans on his behalf.

Costly send-off

In their own legal action, The Management Group said their former client had “refused to live within his means, despite… repeated warnings about his financial condition”.

They claimed the actor’s outgoings included $3m (£2.3m) to blast the ashes of author Hunter S Thompson out of a cannon – a send-off Depp said had actually cost him $5m (£3.9m).

The Oscar-nominated actor is best-known for his role as Captain Jack Sparrow in the Pirates of the Caribbean series, the fifth instalment of which arrives this summer.

Disney have announced that Dead Men Tell No Tales will have its world premiere at the Shanghai Disney resort on 11 May – the first Hollywood premiere to be held in mainland China.


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Tom Hardy apprehends ‘fleeing motorbike thief’ in London

Tom Hardy apprehends ‘fleeing motorbike thief’ in London

  • 25 April 2017
  • From the section London

Tom HardyImage copyright
Getty Images

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The actor pursued one of the suspects who had run from the scene of a crash

Actor Tom Hardy helped to apprehend a man who had allegedly stolen a motorbike in London, police have said.

The Hollywood star stepped in after two teenagers on the bike crashed into a car in Richmond, south-west London, on Sunday afternoon.

They ran off before one was grabbed by the Mad Max and Taboo star and the other was arrested by a police officer.

Two 16-year-olds have been arrested on suspicion of theft of a motor vehicle, police said.

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Getty Images

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Tom Hardy recently starred in the BBC period thriller, Taboo

Witness Arun Pullen told The Sun newspaper: “Tom must have been walking down the road.

“He went off like a shot in pursuit and looked furious.

“I asked Tom what happened and he told me he chased him through my back garden and caught him around the block – but the route was like an assault course.”

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Tom Hardy set hearts a-flutter on Facebook when he recently read the CBeebies bedtime story

A Richmond Police spokesman said: “We can confirm that there were two people on a stolen moped that went through a red light and crashed into another vehicle.

“The males ran off and one was detained by Tom Hardy.

“Both suspects were initially taken to hospital with non-life threatening injuries.”

A Metropolitan Police spokesman later clarified the stolen vehicle was a motorbike and that members of the public detained the rider.

One of the arrested teenagers was riding pillion, it added.

The two teenagers have been arrested on suspicion of various motoring offences including taking a vehicle without consent and theft of a motor vehicle, and remain in police custody.

A spokeswoman for the 39-year-old actor, who has also starred in films including The Dark Knight Rises, The Revenant, Inception and Legend, declined to comment.

Hardy has also appeared in BBC TV drama Peaky Blinders and read a bedtime story on the BBC children’s channel CBeebies.

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The Prettiest Long-Sleeve Wedding Dresses at Bridal Fashion Week

Bridal Fashion Week is already in full swing in New York City, where designers are showing their spring 2018 collections. But that doesn’t mean it’s all strapless gowns, quite the opposite. Swoon-worthy long-sleeve wedding silhouettes are attracting their fair share of attention.

Reem Acra showed a gorgeous sweetheart-neck off-the-shoulder number with bow sleeves that were a total head-turner. And designer duo Sachin and Babi Ahluwalia sent down the runway an exquisite deep V-neck ball gown with long sleeves made from delicate lace.

VIDEO:11 Times Celebs Basically Wore Wedding Dresses to the Red Carpet

Take a look at some of the most beautiful long-sleeve designs and keep checking for regular updates.

Will Smith joins Cannes film festival jury

Will Smith joins Cannes film festival jury

Will SmithImage copyright
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Will Smith has been nominated for two Oscars (The Pursuit of Happyness and Ali)

Hollywood stars Will Smith and Jessica Chastain will sit on the Cannes jury when the festival kicks off next month.

The pair, both former Oscar nominees, will help choose the Palme d’Or winner from films including Michael Haneke’s Happy End and Sofia Coppola’s Beguiled.

They are joined by the likes of Chinese X-Men actress Fan BingBing and Paulo Sorrentino, whose recent hit TV series The Young Pope starred Jude Law.

The jury is being presided over by Spanish director Pedro Almodovar.

The festival runs for two weeks in May, thankfully not clashing with Smith’s headline gig with DJ Jazzy Jeff at Blackpool’s Livewire event in August.

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EPA

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The Cannes Film Festival is celebrating its 70th anniversary

French actress and singer Agnes Jaoui, German director Maren Ade, South Korean filmmaker Park Chan-Wook and French composer Gabriel Yared will also join the Cannes panel.

Yared’s scores include those for The English Patient, for which he won an Oscar, and The Talented Mr Ripley.

Lynne Ramsay is the only British director with a film in competition. Her latest feature, a thriller titled You Were Never Really Here, stars Joaquin Phoenix.

As usual, there will be a number of special screenings out of competition. This year, Barack Obama and Donald Trump will be seen in a An Inconvenient Sequel, Al Gore’s follow-up to his 2006 climate change documentary An Inconvenient Truth.

The Cannes film festival runs from 17 to 28 May.


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Short, Wavy Hairstyles That Will Make You Ditch Your Flatiron

Going short for summer doesn’t just apply to hemlines—it’s a seasonal given for haircuts as well. And with spring beauty’s glorious low-maintenance vibe, combined with the fact that a new beach spray launches seemingly every day, treating your bob, lob, or even pixie to a tousled, wavy, and undone style is a must. If these celebrity looks don’t convince you to ditch your flatiron and call up your salon, we don’t know what will.

VIDEO: 3 Ways to Get Effortless Waves